Chateau Martet
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Chateau Martet
Chateau Martet Grand Vin de Bordeaux  
Chateau Martet
Chateau Martet
Chateau Martet
Chateau Martet
exceptional soil
Chateau Martet
perfect balance between young and old vines
 
Chateau Martet
history
Château MARTET, venerable monastery built in the 13C, relief centre of the Templar Order for the pilgrims of Saint Jacques de Compostelle, was acquired in 1991 by the present owners who did their best to re-establish the vineyard’s and the property’s worth right from the start.
Our exceptional soil has been devoted to viticulture since the Roman era, this being generalized since the 13C.

Being situated at 25 km from Saint-Emilion the vineyard of nearly 25 hectares all in one piece is located on the plateau and the slopes dominating the Dordogne at an altitude of 100 m, in the vicinity of the small town (ancient fortified town of the 13C ) of Sainte-Foy-la-Grande.

18 hectares of the soil is of the clay-limestone type ( predominating in the Saint-Emilion zone ) and the highest part of 7 hectares is of the clay-gravel type.
After two years of observation it was decided to embark on a vast programme of restructuring of the vineyard that started in 1993 and will be finished in 2006.

The first aim was to pull out the grape varieties that were badly adapted to the soil, that is to say Cabernet Sauvignon and Cabernet-Franc which only very seldom reach optimal maturity and cause undesirable tastes of green peppers…. And on the other hand the pulling out of the too large vines with weak planting density which often results in diluted wines…

Our 2004 vintage, was our last hectare of Cabernet production and the entirety of the large vines will have been pulled out (except for the one and a half hectare meant for the vinification of Martet Clairet) and will be replaced by a low vine having a density of 6000 stocks per hectare. It is obvious that we have saved the low vine fragments of old Merlots dating from 1960-1965, in order to maintain a perfect balance between young and old vines.